Information and Advice on Recycled, Up-cycled and Reclaimed Furniture ...
Trash Talks on Garden Recycle …
  • Trash Talks on Garden Recycle

Trash Talks on Garden Recycle …

It’s Easy to be Green with Trash Talks …

These books should be read by everyone. Lillian and Dave Brummet’s Trash Talks series of books offer meaningful and handy advice on how to make your lifestyle more green. Below we’ve included a snippet of the sort of advice on offer …

Make your own plant tags and harvest buckets …

Ideas for recycling in the garden from Trash Talks

If you or anyone you know is replacing old Venetian style blinds (plastic or metal) make sure they know you are interested in them. The slats are perfect for cutting into little plant tags.  Using a pair of strong scissors, simply cut the slats to the desired length (I tend to cut them 6”) and taper one end to a point – that is the end you push into the ground or soil flat where you have started the seedlings.
Similarly you can repurpose clean plastic tub containers (from cottage cheese, yogurt, etc.) for plant tags as well. Starting at the rim cut a straight line down to the bottom of the tub and then turning the scissors cut the bottom off. Cut a series of lines from top to bottom, to the desired thickness (mine are about 1” wide) and taper the one end into a “v” shape.
I place the plastic containers in the top rack of the dishwasher first, to ensure they are clean and then store them stacked together in an old grocery bag until I have enough to work with. In the evenings, while watching TV or something, I’ll work at the containers making a big supply of tags and store those in a clean frozen yogurt container or ice cream bucket.
It is helpful if you use a good quality water resistant felt pen to mark the seed tag clearly, just before you use it. I have found that the same tags can be reused year after year to mark common crop rows (like carrots). The tags are also very handy for seed trays and small pots of seedlings – because they will help support the plastic cover used to prevent the seedlings from drying out too quickly.
Various sized plastic tub containers can be used as seedling pots  - simply cut a few small holes in the bottom for drainage. Larger plastic containers can be used as plant pots, especially if you intend on putting that pot in a more decorative container on the deck or patio. Alternatively you can paint the container (most cities have paint reuse centers where you can pick up someone’s unused paint for free).
Use recycled milk jugs as harvest baskets
Milk jugs and other jugs with handles actually make good harvest buckets. Cut a large opening in the top corner so that the bottom, sides and handle remain Loosely hang the jug by a belt at your waist and when it fills up, it is easily tilted to empty it. We love these harvest buckets because it allows us the freedom to use both hands.
~ Award winning authors of 6 books, Lillian Brummet manages the Brummet’s Conscious Blog in partnership with her husband and business partner – Dave Brummet. The couple’s main focus is to inspire hope in individuals, helping them realize the value of their efforts and encouraging them to become more positive, proactive in life. Dave and Lillian have been recognized as Community Heroes by the LiveSmart BC program. They have also been presented with an award for “outstanding use of various media in ongoing outreach work to reduce waste in our environment” by the Recycling Council of British Columbia. In 2010 the Canadian Wildlife Federation acknowledged the Brummets with Backyard Habitat Certification for their efforts on their property, and both the Brighter Planet and the Green Providers Directory organizations
have also recognized their work. Their book – Trash Talk, Its Easy To Be Green, has won several awards for the compelling information encouraging people to look at “waste” differently and offers hundreds of ideas for gardeners.

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